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Sitting Still: Reflections on Armenian Portrait Photography

Turkish 'genocide' film: An epic too late?

"The key issue in telling any epic story of dispossession, exodus, catastrophe or Holocaust is precisely the manner in which the story is to be told in the literary and cinematic context when all such grand narratives have become suspect. By virtue of a sustained course of more than 100 years of poignant and powerful remembrance, the Armenian tragedy has advanced far too deeply into our political consciousness for a tired old cliche kind of cinematic narrative to do justice to it. If a director is not aware of that fact, he walks perilously between tragedy and kitsch."

“Making Sense is Radical to Making Art”: The Bard MFA | Art & Education

A lost Lebanon caught on camera

WCCW Portrait Studio

Sergei Parajanov
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Sergei Parajanov

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Photographic collages by Holly Roberts go on view at Craig Krull Gallery in Santa Monica this week. Seen here is a work from 2014, “Horse Resting.” (Holly Roberts / Craig Krull Gallery)
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Photographic collages by Holly Roberts go on view at Craig Krull Gallery in Santa Monica this week. Seen here is a work from 2014, “Horse Resting.” (Holly Roberts / Craig Krull Gallery)

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Oh Me, Oh My by Nick Cave
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Oh Me, Oh My by Nick Cave

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"And so we must imagine a new country. Reparations—by which I mean the full acceptance of our collective biography and its consequences—is the price we must pay to see ourselves squarely. The recovering alcoholic may well have to live with his illness for the rest of his life. But at least he is not living a drunken lie. Reparations beckons us to reject the intoxication of hubris and see America as it is—the work of fallible humans."

The Case for Reparations by Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Case for Reparations

Installation of i.d. photos from Studio Anouchiandating from 1935–70 (Tripoli, Lebanon)Photographer: Antranik Anouchian (1908–1991)M. Yammine Collection, Arab Image Foundation
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Installation of i.d. photos from Studio Anouchian
dating from 1935–70 (Tripoli, Lebanon)
Photographer: Antranik Anouchian (1908–1991)
M. Yammine Collection, Arab Image Foundation

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i.d. photos from Studio Anouchian dating from 1935–70
The photographs in this section were used, as similar ones still are today,for the purpose of identifying people on passports, i.d. cards, licenses, permits, and so on. The images comprising this installation were reprinted from thousands of negatives from Studio Anouchian, which was located in Tripoli, in northern Lebanon. Antranik Anouchian (1908–1991) was born in Sivaz, Turkey, and fled the Armenian genoicide of 1915 after losing his parents and six brothers, seeking refuge in Aleppo’s orphanage before settling in Tripoli. He studied at Vahan Derounian’s studio, taking it over when Derounian moved away shortly before World War II. Like most Armenian photographers of the time, Anouchian perfected his studio skills; he was particularly adept at retouching. He stored his negatives in stock boxes, inscribing them in Armenian with the year and one of three categories: men, women, or couples. Following a disastrous flood, the  boxes were rescued by a collector and donated to the Arab Image Foundation in 1998. Most of Anouchian’s subjects remain unidentified.
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i.d. photos from Studio Anouchian dating from 1935–70

The photographs in this section were used, as similar ones still are today,for the purpose of identifying people on passports, i.d. cards, licenses, permits, and so on. The images comprising this installation were reprinted from thousands of negatives from Studio Anouchian, which was located in Tripoli, in northern Lebanon. Antranik Anouchian (1908–1991) was born in Sivaz, Turkey, and fled the Armenian genoicide of 1915 after losing his parents and six brothers, seeking refuge in Aleppo’s orphanage before settling in Tripoli. He studied at Vahan Derounian’s studio, taking it over when Derounian moved away shortly before World War II. Like most Armenian photographers of the time, Anouchian perfected his studio skills; he was particularly adept at retouching. He stored his negatives in stock boxes, inscribing them in Armenian with the year and one of three categories: men, women, or couples. Following a disastrous flood, the  boxes were rescued by a collector and donated to the Arab Image Foundation in 1998. Most of Anouchian’s subjects remain unidentified.

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Antranik Anouchian Studio portrait. Lebanon / Tripoli 1967   Negative sheet Arab Image Foundation Collection: Joseph al Hajj
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Antranik Anouchian 
Studio portrait. Lebanon / Tripoli 
1967 
  
Negative sheet 
Arab Image Foundation 
Collection: Joseph al Hajj

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Studio portrait. Tripoli, Lebanon. Antranik Anouchian. Collection: AIF/ Mohsen Yammine © Arab Image Foundation
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Studio portrait. Tripoli, Lebanon. Antranik Anouchian. Collection: AIF/ Mohsen Yammine © Arab Image Foundation

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